Prodigal of VVIP Fame Issues Warning To Shatta Wale: ‘Stop Destroying People’s Brand, Reputation For Fame’

Prodigal of VVIP Fame Issues Warning To Shatta Wale: ‘Stop Destroying People’s Brand, Reputation For Fame’

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Following Shatta Wale’s series of verbal insults at veteran musicians like Tic Tac and VVIP, Prodigal (a member of VVIP) has issued a stern warning to the Dancehall artiste to refrain from his uncouth attitude.

In an exclusive interview on Hitz FM, Prodigal, said it’s about time the controversial musician stopped riding on the brand of other musicians to gain publicity.

Prodigal emphasized amongst other things that to put make Ghanaian get due recognition worldwide, certain must be implemented and not how Shatta Wale is going about it.

Here’s what he said:

‘We all come from different homes and we have different mind-sets. I don’t respect bringing people down. Or get a good name by destroying the reputation of other people. There is no way on earth that you [Shatta Wale] will ask VVIP what we showed Nigerians. It’s very disrespectful. It’s like asking Dr Nkrumah what he did for Ghana.

I don’t believe in any musician coming on the radio to talk otherwise about others. How many musicians in Ghana have a rep or team in Nigeria promoting their songs? How many do go there to promote their songs? Most of the Nigerians create relationship with our DJs. It’s not always about Payola. It’s about the relationship.

I don’t believe in destroying Nigerian music. They have a policy there. They play 95 per cent Nigerian music and 5 per cent foreign. To get there, we have to do the business. That’s what we have to learn. Let’s have a month to play Ghanaian music; we will realize we don’t even have content.

We [VVIP] stayed in Nigeria for months. We were doing business and interviews. How many of them fly there with their tickets? Some wait for their songs to be big. We have to love our own and support our own. If you want to play 95 % Ghanaian songs and five per cent foreign it’s cool. If you don’t have someone pushing you in their country how do you expect your music to grow there…?’

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